Tell Me Tuesday : A a World Without You by Beth Revis and Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin

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Tell Me Tuesday  is a weekly review put on by La La in the Library check out her blog La La in the Library   It is where we talk about books we have read, are reading, and books we are going to read soon! I just got approved to read A World Without You by Beth Revis. I saw her in March in Tennessee and she was hilarious. I am not very far into it since I am on vacation with the family but what I have read so far is very good. It is a time travel book which can sometimes be confusing but so far this one is easy to follow.

symptoms

Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin

4.5 stars out of 5

I have never read a book quite like this one before! The book starts with the main character introducing them self as Riley and saying to us that the first thing we will want to know is “Am I a boy or am I a girl?” Guess what? We never find out! Throughout the whole book the author never reveals Riley’s gender because this book is instead about being a human.

Riley is starting school at a new high school looking for a new start. Right away Riley is met with stares and comments about his or her’s appearance. Students whisper to each other wondering if Riley is a chick or a dude. Fortunately, Riley befriends, Solo, a football player who sticks up for Riley to the other football players and,Bec, a girl who mostly keeps to herself. Riley’s dad is running for Congress and Riley is afraid to tell his/her parents that he/she is gender fluid in case it ruins Riley’s dad’s chance at winning the election. I admit I was not familiar with the term gender fluid but the author did a great job describing it through Riley’s inner struggles. Some days Riley wakes up feeling more like a boy than a girl or vice versa. Riley rarely acts on these feelings and just tries to be neutral which is why the bullying starts in the first place. Again back to “Is that a boy or a girl?” Riley decides to start an anonymous blog to help cope with all the stress and anxiety. The blog becomes unexpectedly popular and Riley must now deal with this new responsibility of helping others like him/herself.

This book explores our society’s first impression judgement about others. Does it really matter if the person you are talking to is male or female? Or is it more important that they are a human just like you trying to make it in this world?

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8 thoughts on “Tell Me Tuesday : A a World Without You by Beth Revis and Symptoms of Being Human by Jeff Garvin

  1. La La in the Library says:

    I requested this on Netgalley and wasn’t approved, but I still want to snag it from the library. I was surprised at the number of readers who were turned off by the MC’s gender (and I think in this case by the way the reviews were worded, the character’s actual sex) not being revealed, but that was the whole idea of the book! I think I would be mad if the author had revealed it. I was lucky enough to have grow up in a family that didn’t care what I liked or did. I had dolls, but I also had Matchbox cars and I recieved a fully stocked toolbox for my thirteenth birthday. I also skateboarded back when girls didn’t do that. I remember people making off-hand remarks here and there about some of my tomboy activities, but nothing ever severe. I did, however, always feel like a girl; a girl just doing what she liked. I think I might do a post about this on my personal blog. Thanks for the inspiration. It is so much easier being a girl who likes “boy things” than a boy who likes “girl things”. I definitely want to read this book. Great review. ☺

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ardis @ Pondering The Prose says:

    Now I really want to read this book. I have a teen daughter who I am always asking, “what does this term mean?”. She has been very patient in explaining so many identity questions. I think it is wonderful that many teens are so accepting of the multitude of gender identities now. But that is not the case everywhere.

    Liked by 1 person

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